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Archive for the ‘Personal Bible Study’ Category

This is part of a reflection written by Fr. Jerome Kodell, OSB. It is something I’ve been learning and love how clearly he expressed it!

“When I returned from graduate studies many years ago, my time was taken up by many things: preparing and teaching classes, researching, working on special projects. I was very busy and I hated to be interrupted while I was working or on the trail of some exciting idea.

I thought all was going well until my spiritual director said, ‘Yes, you’re doing very well, except for one thing.’

“What’s that,” I asked, startled and ready to be offended.

“When someone wants to talk to you, you’re too busy. ‘Not right now. See me later.’ That’s Christ trying to get a minute of your time. You’re putting him off, but he wants to make your time his time.”

That got my attention, and I could see it was true. But how do I change that pattern? “That’s easy,” he said. “When someone interrupts you with a knock on the door or a telephone ring, instead of frowning at the interruption, before you answer say to yourself, ‘I wonder what Christ looks like this time; I wonder what Christ sounds like this time.'”

It is a little thing, but it makes all the difference.

I wonder what Christ will look like today?¬† ūüôā

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“You can pray for him, if you want.”

Words from a dear one, tentatively reaching out for prayer. Raised in the church but long absent, a trial faces him that makes him sad and afraid.

And so I pray for them all: healing for the one, and that God would stir their hearts and help them turn to Him in prayer themselves; that they would learn to trust God and grow in love for Him.

This is my deepest desire for all of my loved ones – that they seek Him, know Him, love Him. I hope and pray this¬†for THEIR sake¬†and for His. It is the most wonderful thing I could hope for anyone; it is my own greatest treasure and who doesn’t want the best treasures for the people they love the most?

A week later, a text: “Positive thoughts and¬†good wishes worked! He is cancer-free, and there is no tumor at all!”

My heart sinks just a little. Of course I’m thrilled at the news; it is wonderful! But just as it’s human nature to think of God when we are in distress, it’s also human nature to forget Him when things go our way. Good wishes? Thoughts? Where is God in this?

He is where He always is – dwelling within us, waiting, inviting, working in good times and in bad to draw our hearts toward Him.¬†From the cross He declared: “I thirst.”

He thirsts for each and every single soul.

I pray we respond, for our own sake and for His glory.

Love is waiting.

 

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I have been pondering God’s presence within me. In her book He and I, Gabrielle Bossis relayed these words from Jesus to her: “Perhaps I created you only to console Me and to give Me a refuge in your heart where you sing Me the hymn of love. Why shouldn’t I have a home on earth? Must I still have no stone on which to rest my head?”

The first part filled my heart; the second made it ache. I find myself deeply desiring to console Him.

What space do I give Him interiorly? Of what quality is it? Is it a place of rest for Him, a protective and healing refuge?

Psalm 132 relates David’s desire is to build a house for the LORD:

I will not enter the house where I dwell, nor go to bed where I rest;
I will give no sleep to my eyes, to my eyelids I will give no slumber,
till I find a place for the LORD, a dwelling for the Strong One of Jacob.

David was thinking of building a temple. I am thinking of a spiritual temple: Where does the LORD dwell? In our hearts. So how do I go about building a dwelling place for the LORD?

That is a huge question and there are a myriad of tangents to consider. However, one lesson I’ve been learning over the years is the balance of “boldly approaching the throne of Grace” to bring our needs before God, vs. using God as a sort of Santa Claus with our own expectations of how He ought to respond.

In a reflection on the gospel story of Jesus cleansing the temple, Meister Eckhart addressed this very thing. He wrote: “As long as we look for some kind of pay for what we do, as long as we want to get something from God in some kind of exchange, we are like the merchants. If you want to be rid of the commercial spirit, then by all means do all you can in the way of good works, but do so solely for the praise of God … Expect and ask nothing in return. Then the merchant inside you will be driven out of the temple God has made …

“…observe that when all was cleared, there was nobody left but Jesus. And when he is alone he is able to speak in the temple of the soul.”

My soul.

A clean heart create for me, God;
renew within me a steadfast spirit.
(Psalm 51:12)

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Absurdity

Rejoice always.
Pray without ceasing.
In all circumstances give thanks, for this is the will of God for you in Christ Jesus
1 Thessalonians 5:16-18

I’ve blogged about this passage before, about how 15 years ago (!) I had just read and journaled about it when I learned my dad was in ICU. It’s remained a powerful passage for me ever since in both trials and blessings.

It truly is a remarkable thing to ponder. Over the years it’s come to mind repeatedly in very different circumstances:

  • as I traveled through the darkest time in my life dealing with depression and loss
  • as I struggled in my marriage and through the process of rebuilding & growing closer again
  • as I walked with my mom through serious health and mental struggles
  • as I’ve given up some very big and long-held dreams for myself
  • as I’ve looked at the messy world around me and have been angry about politics and news and actions of my fellow man

Am I really supposed to embrace that passage and to rejoice always? In each of those circumstances am I to truly give thanks? Are they really God’s will for me?

How absurd!

And yet … there it is. What does it mean, really? How can I truly believe it, embrace it, and integrate it as part of my life of faith?

The thing is, I do believe it – at least at some level. I do know that God brings good out of evil; that all people have blessings and trials and “what we do about them” shapes who we are. I do believe the poem, The Plan of the Master Weaver (found here) is wise and that dark threads are important in our lives.

The challenge for me is learning to live it, to trust God. That brings me back to prayer¬†– and maybe that’s the point of it anyway.

More and more I understand how little control we really have. Anger¬†and worry¬†always makes me more miserable but don’t solve the problem. I’m learning (over and over) to just take care of the things that God has placed before me, to offer kindness and mercy to¬†others, to try to make¬†my little corner of the world a better place, and to leave the rest to God. He’s got this … really.

And somehow over the years, that passage has come to seem more possible and less absurd.

 

 

 

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Two passages stood out in my morning study, and clearly they are related.

In the first passage God has instructed the people to create a tassel on their garments as a constant reminder of His commandments, lest they follow their own ideas of what is good or evil:

“And it shall be to you a tassel to look upon and remember all the commandments of the Lord, to do them, not to follow after your own heart and your own eyes, which you are inclined to go after wantonly. So you shall remember and do all my commandments, and be holy to your God. I am the Lord your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, to be your God: I am the Lord your God.‚ÄĚ (Num 15:39-41)

Then, in the very next chapter just 4 verses away:

“They assembled themselves together against Moses and against Aaron, and said to them, ‚ÄúYou have gone too far! For all the congregation are holy, every one of them, and the Lord is among them; why then do you exalt yourselves above the assembly of the Lord?‚ÄĚ (Num 16:3)

It is SO EASY to see myself in those passages – following my own heart¬†and eyes, deceiving myself, deciding that what “I” want and desire is good even when I know it opposes¬†what God has said.

And how easily is the same thing seen in society? Nevermind what God commands … we’ll wantonly decide for ourselves what is good and right! Nothing is wrong! Everyone is holy!

Only that’s the lie, isn’t it? We are not all holy; things are not good nor evil because we decide so, no matter what the world tells us. Truth exists and we know where to seek it.

But will we?

Will I?

Oh God, please make me meek and humble, willing to receive whatever You give to me. Help me surrender my will to yours; open my eyes and ears and heart to You, to Truth.   amen.

 

 

 

 

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The book I’m reading¬Ļ shows Jesus as a very tender, intimate friend.

My scripture reading¬≤ last night shows Him as fierce judge, waging war in righteousness with fiery eyes and he himself will “tread out in the wine press the wine of the fury and wrath of God the almighty.”

I¬†know Jesus as a tender, personal and intimate friend to whom I can pour out my heart and with whom I can laugh and be filled. I run into our Father’s arms for comfort and protection. I seek the Holy Spirit to guide me, teach me, advise me.

When I read passages about His power and fury and wrath, I wonder if I will be fearful of Him. I wonder if I have created an image of Him that is more in my own mind than it is reality. And I wonder if it’s like a child who experiences her father as very tender and loving at home while his enemies¬†experience him as powerful and destructive on the battlefield.

The Bible depicts Jesus in many distinct, opposite ways:
The lion … and the lamb
The king of kings and lord of lords … and the suffering servant of all
Ruling with a steel rod … and taking care to not break the bruised reed.
He is creator & commander of great clashes of thunder, seas that roar, and quakes that level mountains … as well as fragile flowers, rainbows, and delicate flakes of frost.
God … and man

I think I do need to take care not to create a god in my own image. I can learn much about God by reading the Bible and believing He is everything it says He is, even when I find it fearful and I don’t fully¬†understand what it means. And I also can trust what I know from my relationship with Him … He is indeed my intimate and tender friend, comforter, teacher.

And I think no matter how well I now Him and how close He draws me, I barely know Him at all. He is so much more than any man can fathom or dream.

While I think it’s good to ponder and wrestle with these things sometimes, I still laugh out loud when I think of the passage He gave me one time when I was demanding an answer:

What is too sublime for you, seek not.
Into things beyond your strength, search not.
What is committed to you, attend to;
for what is hidden is not your concern. (Sirach 4:20-22)

¬ĻHe and I by Gabrielle Bossis
²Revelation 19:11-16

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At daily mass yesterday, Father Secora gave a wonderful homily about the foolishness of the cross vs. the wisdom of the world.

Father said that the message of the cross is essentially this: pouring out our lives for others out of love.

He contrasted two stories from the previous day’s headlines:

The first story reported how the EpiPen Рa life-saving prescription for people with known life-threatening allergies Рhas gone from a cost of $57 in 2007 to almost $700 today. Many low-income people are unable to afford it, though the failure to have one on hand in an emergency could be fatal.  The CEO of the company that makes the EpiPen earns over $19 million a year.

The second story was about two nuns found murdered in Mississippi. Nurse practitioners, they provided medical care to people who could not pay for it in some of the poorest communities in this country. Their medical training would have enabled them to “earn a good living” but instead they dedicated their lives to serving others.

It’s easy to see the application of these two stories to Father’s definition of “the message of the cross.”

The message of the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing,
but to us who are being saved it is the power of God.
For it is written:

I will destroy the wisdom of the wise,
and the learning of the learned I will set aside.

Where is the wise one?
Where is the scribe?
Where is the debater of this age?
Has not God made the wisdom of the world foolish? (From 1 Cor:1)

 

 

 

 

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